Julie and Mike’s paper on multiple stressors was published in Biology Letters!

Abstract Environmental stressors often interact, but most studies of multiple stressors have focused on combinations of abiotic stressors.  Here we examined the potential interaction between a biotic stressor, the vermetid snail Ceraesignum maximum, and an abiotic stressor, high sedimentation, on the growth of reef-building corals. In a field experiment, we subjected juvenile massive Porites corals Read More …

Congratulations Dr. Elizabeth Hamman!

Elizabeth defended her dissertation last week in the Odum School of Ecology at UGA (Multi-scale spatial patterning of corals and their symbionts).  Many thanks to her co-advisor (Scott McKinley, Tulane University) and her committee (Andrew Park and Jim Porter) for all of their support and insights.  Elizabeth is heading off to an exciting post-doc with Read More …

Congratulations to Dr. Jing Jiao!

Jing successfully defended her dissertation (Effects of movement in human-influenced marine systems) on March 16/17 at the University of Florida.  Many thanks to her co-advisor (Sergei Pilyugin) and her committee (Jeremy Lichstein, Bob Holt and Tom Frazer) for all of their support and insights.  Jing has received several post-doctoral offers and will soon be heading Read More …

Mike, Julie and JM’s “landscape of fear” paper is out too (early online)!

Abstract Foraging theory posits that isolation from refuge habitat within a landscape increases perceived predation risk and, thus, suppresses the foraging behavior of prey species. However, these effects may depend fundamentally on resource availability, which could affect prey boldness and can change considerably through bottom-up processes. We conducted a field survey and experiment in a Read More …

Jing’s paper in Ecosphere is out!

Jing’s paper on movement and its effect on trophic cascades inside marine protected areas was just published online in Ecosphere. Abstract The protection of predators inside marine reserves is expected to generate trophic cascades with predator density increasing but prey density decreasing; however, predators and prey often both increase inside reserves. This mismatch between the Read More …

Mass mortality of C. maximum in French Polynesia — Update

In July 2015 we observed a mass mortality event of our focal study organism, Cereasignum (previously Dendropoma) maximum in Moorea, French Polynesia.  We have now completed surveys on other islands and have observed NO survivors on any islands in the Societies or Tuamotus: i.e., Mo’orea, Tahiti, Huahine, Raiatea, Taha’a, Bora Bora, Tikehau, Rangiroa, or Fakarava.  Read More …

Adrian is headed to UCSB!

Adrian Stier has accepted a faculty position at UC Santa Barbara [he completed his PhD in the Osenberg lab in 2012 and went on to post-docs at UBC, NCEAS/NOAA, and UW].  He starts this fall in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology.  Congratulations Adrian!

Enrichment scale is out at Oecologia

Our “scale of enrichment” paper was published online recently in Oecologia (it also was picked up by a Huffington Post blogger), which shows that small-scale experiments may overestimate the ability of herbivores to control algal blooms that result from nutrient enrichment.  Congratulations to Mike and Jing!

Congratulations to Dr. Mike Gil!

Mike successfully defended his dissertation (Context dependence in effects of nutrient enrichment on tropical coral reefs) on Oct 8th to the accolades of his PhD committee (thanks to Suzie Mills, Rob Fletcher, Gustav Paulay, Brian Silliman, and Tom Frazer for all of their support and insight).  Mike will be teaching a field course in Marine Read More …