Greg’s paper on spatiotemporal distribution of chinook salmon redds is in TAFS!

(link)  Abstract. Pacific salmon spawning and rearing habitats result from dynamic interactions among geomorphic processes, natural disturbances, and hydro‐climatological factors acting across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We used a 21‐year record of redd locations in a wilderness river network in central Idaho, USA, to examine which covariates best predict the spawning occurrence Read More …

Presenting Dr. Jacobs (and what did the fish say when it bumped into a wall?)…

Greg Jacobs successfully defended his dissertation this week in the Odum School of Ecology at UGa (Population-level consequences of environmental variation for migratory fishes).  Greg’s research examined migratory dynamics in two systems: sturgeon in the Niagara river and Chinook in the Middle Fork Salmon River.  Greg’s studies in both studies relied on sophisticated modeling approaches Read More …

Anya’s paper on extended phenotypes! Early view in Ecology…

(pdf)  Abstract: Phenotypic variation can lead to variation in the strength and outcome of species interactions. Variation in phenotypic traits can arise due to plastic responses to environmental stimuli, underlying genetic variation, or both, and may reflect differences in the focal organism or aspects of the extended phenotype (e.g., associated microbes). We used a reciprocal Read More …

Chao’s paper on non-independence in meta-analysis is out in Ecology!

(pdf)  Abstract. In ecological meta-analyses, nonindependence among observed effect sizes from the same source paper is common. If not accounted for, nonindependence can seriously undermine inferences. We compared the performance of four meta-analysis methods that attempt to address such nonindependence and the standard random-effect model that ignores nonindependence.  We simulated data with various types of Read More …

Paula’s paper on meta-analysis methods is out in MEE!

(pdf)  Abstract 1. Despite the wide application of meta-analysis in ecology, some of the traditional methods used for meta-analysis may not perform well given the type of data characteristic of ecological meta-analyses. 2. We reviewed published meta-analyses on the ecological impacts of global climate change, evaluating the number of replicates used in the primary studies Read More …

Jing’s paper on mobility and consumer-resource patterns is out in Royal Society Open Science

(pdf)  Abstract: An animal’s movement rate (mobility) and its ability to perceive fitness gradients (fitness sensitivity) determine how well it can exploit resources. Previous models have examined mobility and fitness sensitivity separately and found that mobility, modelled as random movement, prevents animals from staying in high quality patches, leading to a departure from an ideal Read More …

Team Thalassoma, Take Two!

Team Thalassoma’s second paper on moonlight and reproduction and recruitment patterns in T. hardwicke led by Captain Jeff S. Shima is out in Ecology (pdf).  Abstract: Most organisms reproduce in a dynamic environment, and life‐history theory predicts that this can favor the evolution of strategies that capitalize on good times and avoid bad times. When Read More …

Welcome our newest lab members

We are delighted to welcome Dan Cryan (left) and Alex Primo (Center) to our lab.  Dan graduated from Stanford in 2018, and is currently an ORISE intern at the EPA in Rhode Island.  Alex graduated from UCSB in 2018, and worked with us in Moorea in 2019.  We’re looking forward to having them both here Read More …

Elizabeth’s paper on coral damage and healing came out (a while ago – oops) in Oecologia!

[Better late than never — I forgot to post this earlier]  Elizabeth’s paper investigating the spatial distribution of damage on corals and its effects on healing and growth came out at the end of 2019 in Oecologia.   Abstract:  Many predators and herbivores do not kill their prey, but rather remove or damage tissue. Prey are Read More …

Dr. Shirk and the Karma Chameleon

Phil defended his dissertation this month in the Biology Department at the University of Florida (Chameleons in a Changing Climate).  Phil’s work highlighted changing environments, thermal performance curves, and the responses of trophic chamelons, based upon his work in the East Usumbara Mountains in Tanzania.   He did a great job — and there was even Read More …

Amy’s research testing settlement shadows in mosquitoes was published!

Abstract.  Colonization, including oviposition, is an important driver of population and community dynamics both within and across habitat patches. Most research has focused on the roles of habitat availability or quality on colonization and its outcomes. However, the spatial distribution of habitats also likely affects these processes. We conducted field experiments in Georgia, USA, using Read More …

Our muricid-vermetid paper is out in MEPS!

Our team’s paper (pdf), led by Anya, on the interaction between muricids and vermetids came out today in MEPS.  Abstract: Predators, through their effects on prey densities, sizes, and behaviors, can shape ecological communities. Thus, quantitative assessments of predator−prey relationships are key to understanding these effects. Here, we documented the patterns and processes underlying the Read More …

Lauric’s paper on the Moorea MPA is online in Ecosphere!

Lauric’s paper (pdf) on the response of fishes to the Moorea MPA network is now on-line at Ecosphere.  Abstract:  Marine protected area (MPA) networks, with varying degrees of protection and use, can be useful tools to achieve both conservation and fisheries management benefits. Assessing whether MPA networks meet their objectives requires data from Before the establishment Read More …